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Articles » Advice » Brestfeeding advice from Claire Boyle

Brestfeeding advice from Claire Boyle

One of the great things about breastfeeding is that it is such a pleasure to do; it is a wonderful way to connect and bond with your baby all the while providing the absolute best nutrition possible.
 
Breastfeeding is really really convenient!
 
Breastfeeding provides numerous scientifically proven health advantages over formula feeding for baby and mum!!
 
Research has shown that when a baby is not breastfed for the first three months of life they are five times more likely to be admitted to hospital with diarrhoea, two times more likely to be admitted to hospital for breathing problems (asthma, chest infections) and or ear infections and twice as likely to develop eczema and five times more likely to develop a urinary tract infection.
 
Breastfeeding saves money!
 
For more information on this question go to http://breastfeedingconsultant.ie/index.php/breastfeeding/
“I really want to breastfeed my baby, what steps can I take to ensure that I will be able to breastfeed successfully?”
 
Take a Preparing for Breastfeeding Class while you are pregnant Involve your partner and your family support Learn as much as you can Locate your local support group Immediate Skin to Skin contact after the birth Feed the baby whenever the baby wants to feed Make sure baby has latched on correctly to the breast Take time to rest and recover from the birth and to learn the skill of breastfeeding Surround yourself with support 

If you are having problems, access skilled breastfeeding help promptly www.breastfeedingconsultant.ie or for other IBCLC’s around the country go to http://www.alcireland.ie/wp-content/uploads/IBCLC-in-PP-12-13.pdf
 
For more information on this question go to
 
http://breastfeedingconsultant.ie/index.php/breastfeeding/
 
“How do I know my baby is latched on and breastfeeding correctly?”
 
It shouldn’t hurt
Baby should have a wide open mouth
Baby should be actively sucking for at least ten to fifteen minutes for each feed
After the first three days you should be able to hear gulping and swallowing
If there is pain with breastfeeding — get help promptly from a Lactation consultant see
 
www.breastfeedingconsultant.ie or http://www.alcireland.ie/wp-content/uploads/IBCLC-in-PP-12-13.pdf
 
For more information on this question go to http://breastfeedingconsultant.ie/index.php/breastfeeding/
 
 
“How do I get a good latch?”

 
There are many different ways to latch a baby onto the breast.
 
Cradle hold
Cross cradle hold
Laid back nursing position
 
For more information on this question go to http://breastfeedingconsultant.ie/index.php/breastfeeding/
 
“How do I know when my baby is hungry and needs to feed?”

 
Watch your baby for feeding cues
Look for baby bringing the hand to the mouth, opening the mouth as if the latch on.
Sticking the tongue out.
Turning the head towards the breast or trying to latch onto your finger or chin or nose!
Crying is a feeding cue that comes last and is often one you can’t ignore, however if you pick up the early feeding cue your baby probably won’t need to cry.
 
For more information on this question go to http://breastfeedingconsultant.ie/index.php/breastfeeding/
 
“How often will my baby feed and how long will each feed last?”

 
Often & oftener! A breastfed baby should feed at least 8 – 10 times in a 24 hour period and the feeding pattern does not happen at regular intervals, it is normally erratic with some feeds being 30 minutes apart and other feeds being a couple of hours apart.
There is no routine feeding pattern (so don’t expect one!)
Newborns are growing at an amazing rate they need to feed A LOT and EVERY BABY HAS THEIR OWN UNIQUE FEEDING PATTERN
 
Frequent feeding is normal in the first few weeks
The length of an individual feed will vary from feed to feed
Trust your baby!!
Your baby is born with incredible instincts to know when and how long to feed and provided your baby is actively sucking for ten to fifteen minutes a feed for at least 8 to 10 times a day (keeping track with a notebook is a good idea in the first week or so) then you can just relax and trust that your baby knows what is best for him or her.
 
As your baby grows older a feeding pattern will emerge
As your baby grows a feeding pattern will emerge and usually by 8 - 10 weeks most mums will have a good understanding of their own baby’s feeding pattern.
 
For more information on this question go to http://breastfeedingconsultant.ie/index.php/breastfeeding/
 
“How do I know when my baby is finished a feed?”
 
Baby will fall asleep on the breast after breastfeeding
It is normal for a newborn (up to around six weeks of age)to breastfeed for as long as he or she wants to (10 to 40 minutes) and then fall asleep on the breast at the end of the feed.
 
It is perfectly normal to let your baby fall asleep while on the breast and is in fact the best way to help your baby get to sleep — once you see your baby in a deep sleep you can then move him or her if you want to — or you may just want to stay and cuddle up with baby. And don’t worry about your baby falling asleep on the breast — you won’t be creating bad habits by allowing the baby fall asleep on the breast — it is where the baby is meant to fall asleep in the comfort of your arms and the breast is the best pillow there is!!
 
Around 6 weeks the baby will also start to come off the breast independently when he or she has had enough (and probably smile at you !).
For more information on this question go to http://breastfeedingconsultant.ie/index.php/breastfeeding/
 
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